Assembly poised to act on New York City housing

The Assembly appears ready to weigh in on the scandal plagued New York City’s public housing agency.

Late Friday night, Speaker Carl Heastie introduced legislation that  would authorize NYCHA to use design-build procurement processes to quickly respond to its critical infrastructure needs.

“Currently, there are a large number of tenants living in New York City Housing Authority developments requiring a significant amount of work. Given the substantial scope of repairs needed to NYCHA’s heating systems and other critical facilities, a new, more efficient approach needs to be taken by NYCHA to address its capital needs; otherwise, tenants will continue experiencing disruptions,” reads the bill memorandum.

The bill also requires NYCHA to provide annual reports on their response to lead paint health risks. The goal of the requirement, according to the memorandum, is to empower residents and ensure compliance with inspection laws. Continue reading “Assembly poised to act on New York City housing”

Last of the Manhattan Republicans

Republican elected officials from Manhattan once walked the halls of the Capitol.

The last of this dying breed was John Ravitz, who represented the Upper East Side in the Assembly between 1991 and 2002, when he lost a special election for state senate and walked away from public office.

Ravitz joined Poozer Politics to talk about his upset victory for the Assembly in 1990, the mistakes of his campaign for state senate and his place in today’s Republican Party. The conversation also explored his decision to step away from public office after he found himself on the wrong side of a leadership fight in the minority conference.

Continue reading “Last of the Manhattan Republicans”

Mr. Quinn Goes to Albany

The anti-incumbency wave that swept the country in 2010 also made its way through the 58th Senate District in New York that year and handed Jack Quinn III the first election loss of his family’s political career.

The son of a congressman from the Buffalo area, he set out for a career in medicine before turning to law and eventually elected office. Quinn got elected to the Assembly at 26 and was vying for a seat in the state senate just six years later.

This extended episode of Poozer Politics features a conversation with Quinn about growing up in politics, the evolution of his personal ideology and the calculus that went into running for the state senate. He reflects on the Assembly debate over same-sex marriage, shares insights into his multiple campaigns and reveals the seat he almost ran for. Continue reading “Mr. Quinn Goes to Albany”

EXTRA EXTRA: A Primary Win, Loss and a Tar Heel

If at first you don’t succeed, maybe an Assembly seat will open up.

Four years after an unsuccessful bid to be the Democratic nominee for an open-congressional seat in the Capital Region, Phil Steck was victorious in an effort to be his party’s representative in a race for the 110th Assembly District (Spoiler Alert: He still has that seat).

For a bonus episode of Poozer Politics, to celebrate Primary Day, we turned to the assemblyman for insights about these unique electoral bouts. He shared stories about his past primary campaigns, reflected on mistakes, and explained his endorsement from Sam Perkins.

Steck also talked about his affinity for door-to-door campaigning, the role of endorsements, and fundraising. Continue reading “EXTRA EXTRA: A Primary Win, Loss and a Tar Heel”

School’s Out for Freshman Legislator

It was an extraordinary first session for Assemblymember Yuh-Line Niou.

Niou joined Poozer Politics to reflect on her first year as a member of the Assembly and talked about the personal toll of the late budget, her approach to the legislative process and accomplishments for her constituents.

She also explored the challenge of delegating power and highlighted some of her plans for the rest of the year. Continue reading “School’s Out for Freshman Legislator”