Planting the Seeds for Tax Reform in New York

Thirty years ago, New York overhauled its tax code in response to major reforms at the federal level. Now, with Republicans in Congress hoping to cut cut cut, is reform at the state and local level around the corner?

What would reform in New York look like?  Where is the low-hanging tax fruit? Do state politicians, especially Gov. Andrew Cuomo, have the appetite for a big fight in 2018? Why is loophole a dirty word?

For those answers and more, including their wish list for tax reform in the next legislative session, Poozer Politics turned to Ken Pokalsky, of the Business Council of New York, and David Friedfel, of the Citizen Budget Commission. The conversation touched on the collection of online sales taxes, property taxes in New York City and predictability for businesses.

Continue reading “Planting the Seeds for Tax Reform in New York”

The Formula to Beat Partisan Gerrymandering

Do voters choose elected officials or do elected officials choose their voters?

The answer is usually the latter, as redistricting has become an exact science with states legislators utilizing computer programs that allow them to tip the scales in elections. But now good government advocates have a metric for identifying partisan gerrymandering, the “efficiency gap,” and it could be the basis for a new era in redistricting, depending on a potential ruling from the U.S. Supreme Court.

Jessie Amunson & Jeremy Creelan

Jessie Amunson, one of the lawyers challenging Wisconsin’s legislative lines in the Supreme Court, and Jeremy Creelan, author of a report on gerrymandering for the Rockefeller Institute, joined Poozer Politics to explain the efficiency gap, highlighted the case before the Supreme Court, and explore the legislative lines in New York.

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The Cyrus Vance Rules

Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus Vance’s campaign finance practices appears to have inspired new legislation.

Assemblyman Dan Quart

Assemblyman Dan Quart, a Manhattan Democrat, has introduced legislation that would impost special restrictions on campaign contributions for district attorney candidates. Candidates would be required to disclose any contributions from law firms that represents defendants in criminal proceedings and there will be limits on contributions from people or corporate entities that have “legal dealings” with a district attorney’s office. Continue reading “The Cyrus Vance Rules”

No Fees for Consumer Protection

An episode of Planet Money made me think about freezing my credit and the urging of Jon Oliver on Sunday motivated me to act. Now two state legislators have introduced a bill that would prohibit credit reporting companies from charging me for this safety measure.

Assemblyman Jeffrey Dinowitz and Sen. David Carcucci recently crafted legislation that requires hacked credit reporting agencies to provide lifetime identify theft prevention services and prohibits fees relating to the implementation of security freezes on consumer credit reports. If enacted, the companies would be required to tell affected consumers about these rights. Continue reading “No Fees for Consumer Protection”

(Google) Survey Says…

What can’t Google do?

Well, at this time, it might not be the best source for election poll information, according to Dr. Don Levy, director of the Siena Research Institute.

He joined Poozer Politics to talk about the benefits and challenges of online surveys, including the possibility of Facebook polls, and explored the generic ballot question, which pollsters use to predict control of Congress.

Levy also hinted at an exciting new project for the Siena Research Institute and the first Poozer Politics poll is teased.

Don’t miss previous conversations with Levy, including an episode on likely voters and an episode that addressed the future of polling. Continue reading “(Google) Survey Says…”