Mr. Quinn Goes to Albany

The anti-incumbency wave that swept the country in 2010 also made its way through the 58th Senate District in New York that year and handed Jack Quinn III the first election loss of his family’s political career.

The son of a congressman from the Buffalo area, he set out for a career in medicine before turning to law and eventually elected office. Quinn got elected to the Assembly at 26 and was vying for a seat in the state senate just six years later.

This extended episode of Poozer Politics features a conversation with Quinn about growing up in politics, the evolution of his personal ideology and the calculus that went into running for the state senate. He reflects on the Assembly debate over same-sex marriage, shares insights into his multiple campaigns and reveals the seat he almost ran for. Continue reading “Mr. Quinn Goes to Albany”

EXTRA EXTRA: Alt-Right Financier Funds Local Attack Ad

All politics is local, even if you’re a billionaire.

Robert Mercer, the conservative financier behind Steve Bannon and then-candidate Donald Trump, waded into the Westchester County Executive election last month with nearly $1 million for a super PAC supporting incumbent Rob Astorino.

      Mark Lungariello

Journal News reporter Mark Lungariello joined Poozer Politics to explain Astorino’s ties with Mercer, talk about the impact of the ad blitz against challenger George Latimer and highlight indicators to look for on Tuesday night. Continue reading “EXTRA EXTRA: Alt-Right Financier Funds Local Attack Ad”

The Formula to Beat Partisan Gerrymandering

Do voters choose elected officials or do elected officials choose their voters?

The answer is usually the latter, as redistricting has become an exact science with states legislators utilizing computer programs that allow them to tip the scales in elections. But now good government advocates have a metric for identifying partisan gerrymandering, the “efficiency gap,” and it could be the basis for a new era in redistricting, depending on a potential ruling from the U.S. Supreme Court.

Jessie Amunson & Jeremy Creelan

Jessie Amunson, one of the lawyers challenging Wisconsin’s legislative lines in the Supreme Court, and Jeremy Creelan, author of a report on gerrymandering for the Rockefeller Institute, joined Poozer Politics to explain the efficiency gap, highlighted the case before the Supreme Court, and explore the legislative lines in New York.

Continue reading “The Formula to Beat Partisan Gerrymandering”

The Cyrus Vance Rules

Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus Vance’s campaign finance practices appears to have inspired new legislation.

Assemblyman Dan Quart

Assemblyman Dan Quart, a Manhattan Democrat, has introduced legislation that would impost special restrictions on campaign contributions for district attorney candidates. Candidates would be required to disclose any contributions from law firms that represents defendants in criminal proceedings and there will be limits on contributions from people or corporate entities that have “legal dealings” with a district attorney’s office. Continue reading “The Cyrus Vance Rules”

(Google) Survey Says…

What can’t Google do?

Well, at this time, it might not be the best source for election poll information, according to Dr. Don Levy, director of the Siena Research Institute.

He joined Poozer Politics to talk about the benefits and challenges of online surveys, including the possibility of Facebook polls, and explored the generic ballot question, which pollsters use to predict control of Congress.

Levy also hinted at an exciting new project for the Siena Research Institute and the first Poozer Politics poll is teased.

Don’t miss previous conversations with Levy, including an episode on likely voters and an episode that addressed the future of polling. Continue reading “(Google) Survey Says…”