The Cyrus Vance Rules

Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus Vance’s campaign finance practices appears to have inspired new legislation.

Assemblyman Dan Quart

Assemblyman Dan Quart, a Manhattan Democrat, has introduced legislation that would impost special restrictions on campaign contributions for district attorney candidates. Candidates would be required to disclose any contributions from law firms that represents defendants in criminal proceedings and there will be limits on contributions from people or corporate entities that have “legal dealings” with a district attorney’s office. Continue reading “The Cyrus Vance Rules”

No Fees for Consumer Protection

An episode of Planet Money made me think about freezing my credit and the urging of Jon Oliver on Sunday motivated me to act. Now two state legislators have introduced a bill that would prohibit credit reporting companies from charging me for this safety measure.

Assemblyman Jeffrey Dinowitz and Sen. David Carcucci recently crafted legislation that requires hacked credit reporting agencies to provide lifetime identify theft prevention services and prohibits fees relating to the implementation of security freezes on consumer credit reports. If enacted, the companies would be required to tell affected consumers about these rights. Continue reading “No Fees for Consumer Protection”

(Google) Survey Says…

What can’t Google do?

Well, at this time, it might not be the best source for election poll information, according to Dr. Don Levy, director of the Siena Research Institute.

He joined Poozer Politics to talk about the benefits and challenges of online surveys, including the possibility of Facebook polls, and explored the generic ballot question, which pollsters use to predict control of Congress.

Levy also hinted at an exciting new project for the Siena Research Institute and the first Poozer Politics poll is teased.

Don’t miss previous conversations with Levy, including an episode on likely voters and an episode that addressed the future of polling. Continue reading “(Google) Survey Says…”

EXTRA EXTRA: A Primary Win, Loss and a Tar Heel

If at first you don’t succeed, maybe an Assembly seat will open up.

Four years after an unsuccessful bid to be the Democratic nominee for an open-congressional seat in the Capital Region, Phil Steck was victorious in an effort to be his party’s representative in a race for the 110th Assembly District (Spoiler Alert: He still has that seat).

For a bonus episode of Poozer Politics, to celebrate Primary Day, we turned to the assemblyman for insights about these unique electoral bouts. He shared stories about his past primary campaigns, reflected on mistakes, and explained his endorsement from Sam Perkins.

Steck also talked about his affinity for door-to-door campaigning, the role of endorsements, and fundraising. Continue reading “EXTRA EXTRA: A Primary Win, Loss and a Tar Heel”

New York Regulations Target Cyber Crimes

You don’t listen to this podcast and the story ends. You believe whatever you want to believe about the safety of your personal information with your bank or insurance company.

You listen to this episode, you stay in Poozerland, and Josefa Velasquez explains everything about New York’s new cyber security regulations for financial institutions.

The enacted rules from the state’s Department of Financial Services set minimum standards for cyber security, including a shorter timetable for reporting a breach in security. Josefa breaks down the rationale for the regulations, talks about how they were crafted and highlights the possible global ramifications.

Continue reading “New York Regulations Target Cyber Crimes”